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President Ronald Reagan hosts Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev at the White House in 1987. The two developed a good relationship that kept tensions low during the final years of the Soviet Union. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

U.S.-Russia Summits, From Gravely Serious To Absurdly Comical

U.S.-Russia summits have ignited, and defused, global crises. There was also the time the U.S. Secret Service found Boris Yeltsin in his underwear and slurring his words, desperate for a pizza.

A homeless man in Denver draws heroin into a syringe. Treatment centers in the city say patterns of drug use seem to be changing. While most users once relied on a single drug a?? typically painkillers or heroin or cocaine a?? an increasing number now also use meth. Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images

A Surge In Meth Use In Colorado Complicates Opioid Recovery

CPR News

Last year, 280 Coloradans who died of a drug overdose had methamphetamine in the mix. That's up sharply from 2016 and more than five times the number in 2012.

A Surge In Meth Use In Colorado Complicates Opioid Recovery

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A protester holds up a sign targeting Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff outside the company's headquarters in San Francisco on Monday. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sydell/NPR

Tech Workers Demand CEOs Stop Doing Business With ICE, Other U.S. Agencies

Workers from Salesforce, Microsoft and other firms have been putting pressure on the companies, arguing that they support immoral policies through their ties to the federal government.

Tech Workers Demand CEOs Stop Doing Business With ICE, Other U.S. Agencies

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Aaron Yoder is training for the world championships for backward running, or retrorunning, in Bologne, Italy. Greg Echlin/KCUR hide caption

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Greg Echlin/KCUR

This Coach Wants To Be The Next World Champion In Backward Running

KCUR 89.3

Track coach Aaron Yoder says he finds running backward more comfortable. "When you're running backward, you don't have as much pressure on your knee because you're landing behind yourself," he says.

This Coach Wants To Be The Next World Champion In Backward Running

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Referee Howard Webb of England, right, shows the red card to Netherlands' John Heitinga, left, during the World Cup final soccer match between the Netherlands and Spain at Soccer City in Johannesburg, South Africa, Sunday, July 11, 2010. Martin Meissner/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Martin Meissner/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ex-World Cup Final Referee Talks About This Critical Role Ahead Of Croatia Vs. France

On the eve of the World Cup Final, NPR's Michel Martin chats with former FIFA Referee Howard Webb about what it takes to referee one of the biggest sporting events in the world.

Ex-World Cup Final Referee Talks About This Critical Role Ahead Of Croatia Vs. France

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Nigel Munyati, the director of the Zimbabwean International Film and Festival Trust, launched a film competition based on a single question: "What does it mean to be Zimbabwean?" The submissions came in slowly at first. "Young Zimbabweans are still tentative about taking advantage of that freedom of speech," he says. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

'Free But Not Free': Zimbabwe's Amateur Filmmakers Turn A Lens On Their Country

For a contest after the ouster of Robert Mugabe, filmmakers responded to the question "What does it mean to be Zimbabwean?" Their short films featured some uncomfortable answers.

Drone footage captured by Anthony Murphy shows the outline of an ancient henge, visible in the pattern of crops grown in a field near Newgrange, Ireland. Anthony Murphy/Mythical Ireland hide caption

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Anthony Murphy/Mythical Ireland

In Ireland, Drought And A Drone Revealed The Outline Of An Ancient Henge

As crops get thirsty in Ireland, some plants are faring better than others. Aerial photos show a pattern in crop growth near Newgrange, believed to be the footprint of a previously unknown henge.

Lívia Suarez, who runs La Frida Bike, arrives at the Dendê Valley boot camp for entrepreneurs in Salvador's city center. Catherine Osborn/NPR hide caption

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Catherine Osborn/NPR

'I Know How Far I Can Go': Black Entrepreneurs Overcome Challenges In Brazil

Salvador, the capital of Bahia state, has become a hub for black-owned businesses. A startup accelerator there supports companies based on their potential for social and economic impact.

'I Know How Far I Can Go': Black Entrepreneurs Overcome Challenges In Brazil

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Then-Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg greets her husband, Martin, during her confirmation hearing in 1993. She didn't hesitate to answer questions about Roe v. Wade and other topics she considered settle law. John Duricka/AP hide caption

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John Duricka/AP

The Ginsburg Rule: False Advertising By The GOP

Republican senators contend Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg established a standard of evasion at her 1993 Supreme Court confirmation hearing, but an independent study says otherwise.

Morning dew glistens on a tobacco leaf in a field outside Rolesville, N.C. Despite a worldwide decline in production, tobacco remains North Carolina's most valuable crop. Allen Breed/AP hide caption

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Allen Breed/AP

It Is Legal For Kids To Work On Tobacco Farms, But It Can Make Them Sick

Advocates say that gaps in federal regulations leave child workers vulnerable to the health risks of nicotine and pesticide exposure. Labor laws allow larger farms to hire kids as young as 12.

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